Capulet… Montague… Pipeworks… What’s In a Name?

Pipeworks- Any Other Name 6% abv.

Poured into:  Wine & Whiskey Country snifter, Evil Twin Brewing stemmed craft glass

Appearance:  Unfiltered, pastel honey body with an off-white head.  Good head retention, but it eventually dies down.  Minuscule bubbles zip up from the bottom of the glass.

Aroma:  Lemon, spices, and a definite floral character… must be the rose hips (which, I found out through a quick search, are the berries found on rose bushes)

Taste:  Shall I compare thee to a Saison Dupont?  No.  The much-beloved Saison Dupont is a very classic example of the farmhouse ale style.  Pipeworks on the other hand, offers something different.  While familiar pieces are there- the lemony hop flavors, the spicy yeast kick, and the pilsner malt- the addition of rose petals and rose hips add a layer of depth and oddity.  Sit back and examine the flavor, and you’ll get just the slightest suggestion of tartness.

Feel:  Medium-light, spritzy.  Long, floral and dry finish

Overall:  Ultimately, the names here, are irrelevant to me as much as they are to Juliet.  A great saison of which I think The Bard would approve.  A word to the wise- pour carefully to avoid the yeast being added to your glass, unless you like that sort of thing.

Food Pairings:  chevre cheese, spinach and arugula salad with lemon vinaigrette dressing, fish and chips, beignets with rose hip coulis

Six More Weeks?! Six More Beers.

groundhog-day

With the Super Bowl done and over, we can get back to our regularly scheduled beer drinking.  I mentioned at the start of the year I’d post about deep-winter beers.  Thanks to that miserable rodent, Phil, I guess we have more time to drink them.  Below are my favorite brews for those NW-NJ days with temperature highs in the teens.

Winter Warmers:  More a concept than a style, this one has English origins and typically sports a prominent malt profile coupled with balanced bitterness, and on more than one occasion, spices.  Samuel Smith Winter Welcome is a classic example, but there are plenty of U.S. breweries with their own take, such as Bolero Snort’s Frozen Pasture.

Belgian Strong Darks/Quads/Dubbels:  A good way to sleep the winter away, these brews are usually malty, dark, and strong in the alcohol department.  Beers produced by those magnanimous monks at Chimay are excellent in quality and easy to acquire.

Russian Imperial Stouts:  A favorite dark, high-gravity style of mine.  Roasty, malty, but intensely bitter, a great way to balance out a serving of cheesecake.

Doppelbocks:  The German way to celebrate those chilly nights.  Enjoy in a leather armchair in front of a fire, bearskin rug optional.

Though this makes #7, I feel remiss without mentioning Barleywine.  If you like them sweet and balanced, go for English.  Want something hoppy, and a bit more bitter?  Go American.  J. W. Lee’s Harvest, and a one-year old Sierra Nevada Bigfoot are great choices, respectively.

Come back in a few days when I opine about pairing adult beverages with chocolate, providing ideas for that most romantic holiday, 2/14!