I See Windmills: Dutchcraft Vodka

Dutchcraft_Vodka

On the docket:  Dutchcraft Vodka Small Batch, Five Times Distilled (Winter Wheat) 40% a.b.v.

Poured into:  Wine & Whiskey Country glass

S:  Immaculately clear, no particulate.  Give it a swirl and it does develop legs.

A:  Just the slightest whiff of grain, and I mean slight.  Am I missing something?  I checked other reviews of this product, and the descriptors are riotously hilarious.  Amusing descriptions include: porcelain, rainwater, and even, get this- electrical charge.  Really?

T:  There’s a definite sweetness present, something I’d best describe as “marshmallow.”  For clarification- this is not flavored vodka.  In my mind, this type of spirit should be without any true taste, color, or aroma.  There is a slight aftertaste that I can’t quite define.  The same review citing those crazy aromas provide flavors of under ripe pineapple, mint jelly, and dried strawberries.  It makes me wonder if we’re comparing the same product.

F:  Very dry finish, and as vodkas go, quite smooth.  Slightly creamy.  Medium-bodied with a pleasant warming sensation.

O:  Excellent choice for value-priced vodka.  Skip the Ketel, go for this hidden gem.

 

Suggested food pairing:  caviar, sushi, mozzarella cheese, cured meat

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Rye Sense of Humor: High West Double Rye!

High West Double Rye!

High West Distillery’s Double Rye!

On the docket: High West Distillery’s Double Rye! (46% a.b.v.), a blend of a 2 year old and 16 year old rye.

Poured into: Manhattan cocktail glass

S:  Honey-apricot with just the barest hint of haze plus a fleck or two of particulate.  A note, this is not chill filtered.  The aforementioned process is used to produce a more brilliant color, but robs the spirit of congeners, compounds that help impart favorable flavor.

Let me say something about the bottle:  The bottle has microscopic air bubbles trapped inside, its surface.  It’s dimpled; giving it a rustic, rugged look.  The logo of the distillery in addition to some of the lettering is textured on the glass.  Nice presentation.

A:  The description on the back of the label is quite surprising, citing evergreen, gin, clove, anise, and eucalyptus buttons to name a few flavors.  I certainly a get green, floral element in the aroma, in addition to a sweet corn bourbon-esque note.  Also present in a spicy, earthy component that no rye should be without.

T:  Mirroring much of the aroma, I detect young, green nearly minty flavors.  They subside and the more mature, corn-heavier 16 year old sweetness helps to smooth out the spice.  The finish is slow and pretty long, the heat taking its time to build on its way down the throat.  The clove and anise are most noticeable on the lips and the tongue long after you take a sip.

F:  Full, coating.  Sip this slowly, and it might be a great, natural cough remedy.

O:  Do I like it?  Certainly.  Had this been just the young, brash 2 year without its partner, the 16, I’d deem it undrinkable.  However, High West was wise to blend this spirit in this fashion.  It’s flavorful, it’s affordable, and a thoughtful example of what a blended straight rye whiskey can offer.

Suggested pairings:  Spice cake, my ideal sandwich from my previous post, sweet vermouth in the form of a Manhattan