Dark City Goes Dark: Boom! Roasted – Coffee IPA

Boom_Roasted

On the docket:  16oz. can of Dark City’s Boom! Roasted Coffee IPA

Poured into:  Wine & Whiskey Country stemmed snulip

S:  Hazy pale-gold with a merengue head.  Sustained retention.  Tiny, zippy bubbles wend their way to the top.

A:  When taken in colder, the hops are definitely the dominant note.  Bright stone fruit notes of peach nectarine and a cymbal slash of grapefruit pith.  As it warms up, the earthy, dark roasted notes of the coffee get louder- the bass and floor toms that contrast the bright brassy hops.

T:  Much of the flavor mimics the aroma.  A third player enters- the slightly doughy, grainy malt. All work together to provide a complex experience.  The coffee provides depth and richness, but also bitterness.

F:  Light, fluffy, but carbonated.

O:  A highly enjoyable, sessionable coffee IPA.

Paranormal IPA? Stone’s Ghost Hammer

Stone_Gost_Hammer_IPAOn the docket: 12 oz. can of Stone’s Ghost Hammer IPA

Poured into: Wine & Whiskey Country snifter

S:  A Lightly golden, somewhat hazy body stands beneath a white frothy head.  Decent lacing accrues on the sides of the glass, but the head dissipates, like a specter you’re not sure you saw.  Small zippy bubbles make their way to the top.

A:  A grapefruit citrus mixes with a subtle floral aroma.  A pinch of pine.

T:  Mirroring the aroma, citrus leads, followed by the floral component.  Interesting hop choice.  It finishes with a bit of cracker-y malt and firm but not bracing bitterness.
F:  Medium-light.  Gentle, but discernable carbonation.  Excellent bitterness to balance the malt.
O:  On the lighter side, but a smooth, easy-drinking IPA despite the 6.7% abv.  It’s a bit of a departure from what we expect from Stone, but that’s by no means a bad thing.  An intermediate-level IPA that will vanish quickly from your glass.  Ooooooo!

Suggested food pairing:  Arugula salad with sliced mango, tropical style roasted chicken, fruit tart, medium-sharpness cheddar.

Orange You Glad I Said Bolero? Bolero Snort’s Orange Cream Pop IPA

On the docket:  16 oz. can of Bolero Snort’s Orange Cream Pop IPA (brewed with lactose, orange zest & vanilla beans)

Poured into:  Innis & Gunn craft glass

S:  Honey-gold or Ticonderoga pencil, supporting an off-white head.  It sits around for a while, great retention.  Lacing is thick and doily-like.  Mostly translucent but clear.  Tiny bubbles well up from the base of the glass.

A:  Bright orange citrus and a touch of vanilla stands out first, with a slight pine and subtle sweet malt.  Excellent aroma, could sniff this for the dog days of summer.

T:  Much like the aroma, the orange zest comes through immediately, plus a small dose of pine.  Midway through the malt comes in, simple with a water-cracker starkness.  This is also where the gentle sweetness from the lactose helps to balance out the bitterness of the hops.  The vanilla is in there somewhere, helping your mouth think that you’re cooling off with a creamsicle.  With a crisp and bitter finish, this one makes you reach for more.  Without a doubt an IPA.

F:  Medium body, with some fluffiness.  Finely attuned carbonation.

O:  Intriguing take on an IPA that’s well executed.  It does conjure images of that white van and unforgettable loud-speaker jingle, standing in line, and finally handing over a few dollars for Good Humored relief from the blistering summer sun.

Suggested food pairing:  Green salad with mandarin oranges, chicken and vegetable and mozzarella kabob skewers, fruit salad, fruit tart, ambrosia

Tangerine Dream: Stone’s Enjoy by 5.30.16 Tangerine

On the docket:  22 oz. bottle Stone’s Enjoy by 5/30/16 Tangerine.  Date:  3/24/16.

Poured into:  Wine & Whiskey Country Belgian snifter

A:  Bold aroma of tangerine at first sniff.  After a minute or two, you can also detect a small amount of mango or papaya.  Simple but elegant.

S:  Crystal-bright honey gold body, and a bone collar of dense foam on top.  The head builds, the recedes quickly to a closely hugging ring of suds and a wash of microscopic bubbles in the center.  Tiny bubbles drift to the top of the glass.  Big bands of lacing.

T:  After an initial blast of tangerine and citrus hoppiness, the malt emerges as white-bread crust and just a touch of caramel and molasses.  Brief sweetness.  The hops come in again at the end providing fruitiness and bitterness with an added pine.

F:  Fine carbonation, medium-plus body.  Oily and slick on the palate.  Long, drying and bitter finish.  Despite the 9%+ abv, no real sign of the alcohol via flavor or aroma.

O:  Aggressively hopped and flavorful.  Excellent aroma and just enough sweetness from the malt to provide a counterbalance.  However, the hops and bitterness win out.  Neat variation on the popular “drink it while its fresh” series by Stone.

Pairing suggestions:  Heavy, triple-cream cheese, fruit salad, Pasta primavera/alfredo, tangerine or orange sherbet.

India Pale Beers (IPx) — The Coolship Podcast

In Episode 7, Warren and Matt evaluate the India Pale Ales and India Pale Lagers (IPx’s) from the top 5 mass-market brewers in the US. Follow along at home with: Goose Island’s IPA Leinenkugel’s IPL Ballantine’s IPA Yuengling’s IPL Sam Adams’ Rebel IPA Subscribe to The Coolship on iTunes, RSS, Stitcher, TuneIn, or Pocket Casts […]

via India Pale Beers (IPx) — The Coolship Podcast

Listen to me go off on tangents, ask intelligent questions, and opine about beer with some of the best minds in the industry!

Cloudy with a Chance of Dry-Hopping: Omnipollo’s Fatamorgana

On the docket:  22 oz. bottle of Omnipollo’s Fatamorgana

poured into:  Innis & Gunn stemmed craft glass

S:  Hazy, lemon-gold body with a frothy white head.  Great retention, and thin, consistent rings of lacing.  It recedes to a gentle wash of suds on top, and though translucent and not transparent, carbonation activity is easily observed.  Also, there is a thin layer of yeast in the base of the bottle, so pour carefully.

A:  At first impression, one gets a  bright lemon citrus and pine front.  Added to this is just the slightest twinge of funk, barely there, hiding in the background.  Could it be the yeast or the wheat?  The malt aroma is very muted, but clean and water-cracker like.

T:  Up front, it’s a big dose of lemon and grapefruit bitterness.  A sweet malt note shows up briefly mid-palate, but the finish gives way to a roar of more hops.  Dry, bitter, clean, brisk… and a touch floral on the end.  This is a Double IPA through and through, with flavor squarely in the hop department.

F:  Medium-light, with fine carbonation and a rather long finish of pine and citrus.  A tad fluffy and creamy.

O:  Interesting take on the Double IPA style, with the addition of wheat and oats.  Easy to drink, dangerous at 8%, no perceived alcohol from either aroma or taste.

Suggested food pairing:  used as base in vinaigrette dressing over arugula and walnut salad, steamed lobster and shellfish, lemon tart, and mild, creamy cheese

This is the Time, This is the Place: Evil Twin’s Modern IPA

On the docket:  12 oz. can of Evil Twin’s Modern IPA

Poured into:  Innis & Gunn stemmed craft glass

S:  Warning, un-filtered, “artisanal” IPA on the loose!  A cloudy, floaty-filled body occupies the glass as a honey-gold.  The head, welling up, sports many small pocks in an off-white crown.  Bubble activity hard to detect through the murk.  Good head retention.

A:  Holy Contrast, Batman!  The two beers (Retro and Modern) couldn’t be more different in the use of hops.  Bright mango/guava/papaya plus grape fruit curl up into your nose.  Give it a long sniff.  Fruity, pleasant.  Just a hint of dank pine.

T:  Much of the aroma is found in the taste, with the tropical fruit playing first-chair.  The grapefruit is rind-like and bitter.  The malt plays understudy, providing a slight grainy sweetness.  The bitterness enters in the middle, and sticks around at the end, but unlike Retro, this beer finishes bitter and juicy at the same time.

F:  Medium full, with fine carbonation.  A bit oily.  Strong hoppy finish of tropical fruit and bitterness.  Not as extreme as Retro, but unmistakably an IPA.

O:  Talk about a study in contrasts.  Vastly different use of hops than Retro:  different flavors, different aromas, different finishes.  Evil Twin also tried to capture a snapshot of a modern IPA in all senses, including the visual aspect.  Great style study in drinking both beers, recognizing the versatility of hops.

Suggested food pairing:  Rold Gold Honey-wheat pretzels, arugula salad with mandarin oranges, Jerk chicken

Anyone catch the Genesis song reference?

Evil Twin’s Excellent Adventure: Evil Twin’s Retro IPA

On the docket:  12 oz. can of Evil Twin’s Retro IPA

Poured into:  Innis & Gunn stemmed craft glass

S:  Possibly the best aspect of this beer:  Crystal clear orange and gold body, tiny bubbles zipping up to form a vanilla-cream colored head.  It sits high and thick, with excellent retention.  Lacing in thing, consistent rings

A:  Immediately greeted by a light corn-sweetness and very subtle, almost non-existent hop aroma of… hops.  I can’t quite place it.  I’m confused, but it smells like half-hearted pine sap.  Also present is a white bread, doughy malt profile.

T:  The taste of the malt mimics the aroma:  doughy and corny.  Perhaps pale or Pilsner malt.  It starts sweet but changes over mid-palate to a full-on bitter bite that follows all the way through to the finish.  Piney, a touch of pine, and wait, a dash of pine.  I can taste the retro.  The hops here are not so much for flavor as they are utilized for straight bitterness.  Let this warm just a tad, and the flavors are more cohesive.

F:  Medium light, with fine carbonation.  Strong bitter finish with bracing, dry lip-smacking sensation.  Clean, cutting.  Resets your palate for the next sip.

O:  A recipe from just two years after I was born, I was not hip to the hops then.  I was still drinking apple juice.  If you’ve ver wanted to jump in a phonebooth or hot tub and try to travel back in time, this beer is for you.  If you’re all about tropical hops that haven’t even been named yet, stick we me, as I’ll follow this review up with Retro’s counterpart, Modern.

Suggested food pairing:  Keebler Pizzeria chips (circa 1980), medium-rare hamburger with LTO and mustard, creamy bleu or cheddar cheese

MAGnificent IPA: Dogfish Head’s Romantic

On the docket:  12 oz. bottle of Dogfish Head’s Romantic Chemistry IPA (brewed with mango, apricot and ginger)

A:  Ripe mango greets the nostrils.  The apricot is reminiscent of peaches in syrup you ate as a child in elementary school, sweet and fragrant.  The ginger however, is a little more hidden, manifesting as a slight spice kick.

S:  Amber-orange and wonderfully clear, the body fills out the glass and sports a bone colored head that builds high.  After it settles down, it still has some density, sustaining as a half-inch cap.  Lacing is viaduct-ish, with arched legs.  A long continuous trail of bubbles rise to the top from the base of the glass.

T:  The fruit shows up all at once, and lingers for quite a while.  Mid palate, the malt shows up briefly, a cracker-clean sweetness.  The finish is both juicy and drying, the fruit persisting all the way through to the end.  This is also where the ginger is easiest to detect, providing a spicy kick in addition to the hops.  Though bitter, it’s in order to bring contrast to what could be an overly-sweet fruit beer.

F:  Medium-light, with just a hint of smooth creaminess.  Carbonation is moderate and provides a nice scrub, urging you to take another sip, and then another.

O:  If you enjoy fruity IPAs, then this will be love-at-first-sip for you.  The ginger adds a nice contrast, balancing out the sweetness provided by the fruit.  An enjoyable fruit IPA, and something to offer someone who only thinks IPAs are nasty, hoppy, and bitter.

Suggested food pairing: Arugula salad with vinaigrette dressing and blood oranges, Roasted duck with orange coulis, fruit tart, creamy cheddar cheese

 

Magical Mystery Hop Bill: Firestone Walker’s Luponic Distortion Revolution #001

On the docket:  12 oz. bottle of Firestone Walker’s Luponic Distortion Revolution #001, bottled on 2/20/16

Poured into:  Firestone Walker Pint Glass

S:  Pale straw with a slight golden hue dazzles in the early morning sun.  The head, off-white, builds to a dense quarter-inch and sticks around for a long while before relaxing into a tight ring.  Lacing is consistent and bandy.  Lazy bubbles rise to the surface from the base of the glass.  They seem to sense it’s a Saturday, and take their time.

A:  A zesty blend of citrus, pine, mango, lime.  A touch of peach and a light candy sweetness.  Malt took the day off.  There’s a mild spice note that I want to call… cinnamon and brown sugar.  This one you really have to look for, adding a bit of nuance to a very fruit/pine driven aroma.

T:  Pine resin meets your palate first, followed by subtle water-cracker malt and a wheat-y twang.  The finish reminds me of tonic water (quinine) with a bit of lime thrown in for flavor.  This is not a bad thing, as American IPAs should be hoppy, dry, and bitter.  A great lingering taste of pine, too.  I will agree with some opinions that this gets a little sweeter over time, the malt emerging a bit more, adding balance, but not interfering with the star of the show.

F:  Long, drying finish; a touch oily and coating on the tongue.  Bitter, resinous end.

O:  I’ve read reviews calling this “hop water.”  Nonsense.  Though the malt is a little sparse, this brew is meant to showcase the hops, whatever they may be.  The varietals are undisclosed, adding to its mystique and allure.  Fans of a gin and tonic would enjoy this, as would fans of IPAs that are aromatic, flavorful, and on the gentler side of the abv spectrum (this one weighs in at 5.9%) making this one, dare I say it and sound like a Hipster… crushable?

Suggested food pairing:  Arugula salad with mandarin oranges on top, honey mustard chicken wings/tenders/strips, tropical fruit tart, Monterey jack cheeseFW_Luponic_Distortion_Revolution_001