India Pale Beers (IPx) — The Coolship Podcast

In Episode 7, Warren and Matt evaluate the India Pale Ales and India Pale Lagers (IPx’s) from the top 5 mass-market brewers in the US. Follow along at home with: Goose Island’s IPA Leinenkugel’s IPL Ballantine’s IPA Yuengling’s IPL Sam Adams’ Rebel IPA Subscribe to The Coolship on iTunes, RSS, Stitcher, TuneIn, or Pocket Casts […]

via India Pale Beers (IPx) — The Coolship Podcast

Listen to me go off on tangents, ask intelligent questions, and opine about beer with some of the best minds in the industry!

Who Needs Joe Francis?: Stillwater / Westbrook Gose Gone Wild

On the docket:  22 oz. bottle of Stillwater Artisanal Ales’ Gose Gone Wild

Poured into:  Innis & Gunn stemmed craft glass

S:  A fuzzy lemon-yellow body with a stark, evanescent head.  Reminiscent of pear juice.  Great bubbles.  It’s damn-near opaque.  You could not read a book through this beer.  Lacing is thin, splotchy, but consistent.

A:  This voluptuous aroma is just peachy.  A mélange of peach, brine, funk and mild citrus round out this buxom brew.  Think peach and grapefruit Jolly Rancher… but real.  for those of you that enjoy the aroma of Bier de Garde, it’s heading in that direction.  Thanks, brett.

T:  Woooooo!  I had to pull my cheeks out, man that’s tart.  However, once the initial shock (like seeing a family member on tv) wears, off, you dive right back in for more.  Doughy malt and an added tang from the wheat provide a great sweetness to the beer.  The salt keeps things in check, it’s like the black bar in “those videos.”  No hops on the palate to speak of, but that’s to be expected for a traditional gose.

F:  Light, creamy, and carbonated.  Short, crisp finish that compels you to take another sip, then another.

O:  Great session beer if you can handle the tartness.  At 4.2%, this one will let you go a little crazy and still feel safe.  Mardi Gras beads totally unnecessary.

Suggested food pairing:  funky cheese, citrus-based salads, raw oysters or clams on the half-shell, fresh fruit salad, pear soufflé

 

Cloudy with a Chance of Dry-Hopping: Omnipollo’s Fatamorgana

On the docket:  22 oz. bottle of Omnipollo’s Fatamorgana

poured into:  Innis & Gunn stemmed craft glass

S:  Hazy, lemon-gold body with a frothy white head.  Great retention, and thin, consistent rings of lacing.  It recedes to a gentle wash of suds on top, and though translucent and not transparent, carbonation activity is easily observed.  Also, there is a thin layer of yeast in the base of the bottle, so pour carefully.

A:  At first impression, one gets a  bright lemon citrus and pine front.  Added to this is just the slightest twinge of funk, barely there, hiding in the background.  Could it be the yeast or the wheat?  The malt aroma is very muted, but clean and water-cracker like.

T:  Up front, it’s a big dose of lemon and grapefruit bitterness.  A sweet malt note shows up briefly mid-palate, but the finish gives way to a roar of more hops.  Dry, bitter, clean, brisk… and a touch floral on the end.  This is a Double IPA through and through, with flavor squarely in the hop department.

F:  Medium-light, with fine carbonation and a rather long finish of pine and citrus.  A tad fluffy and creamy.

O:  Interesting take on the Double IPA style, with the addition of wheat and oats.  Easy to drink, dangerous at 8%, no perceived alcohol from either aroma or taste.

Suggested food pairing:  used as base in vinaigrette dressing over arugula and walnut salad, steamed lobster and shellfish, lemon tart, and mild, creamy cheese

Hear Your Favorite Beer Blogger on the Air

To all of you who have faithfully read and followed me, I’ve a treat for you…

https://coolshippodcast.com/

In the latest (and there will be a second, longer podcast uploaded soon) episode of the Coolship Podcast, I guest host, sitting between the two Einstein’s of Eisbeer and Professors of Pilsner, Matt Czigler (formerly of Kane Brewing) and Warren Wilson (owner of Homebrew University in Hackettstown, NJ).  It was an honor, and an uproariously good time.  The knowledge in their heads left me in awe.

Also, Sunday was a momentous day for me.  I brewed for my first time, with the aid and instruments of Warren, at his shop.  The style choice?  A Baltic Porter.  Based on my Polish heritage, it made perfect sent.  I plan to call it Shoe POLISH.  My bottle date is May 1st.  I’ll keep you posted.

Until then, stay thirsty, readers!

Orange You Glad for El Dorado Hops? Maine Beer Co.’s A Tiny Beautiful Something

On the docket:  Maine Beer Co.’s A Tiny Beautiful Something

poured into:  Innis & Gunn stemmed craft glass

S:  A honey-gold body fills out underneath a thick creamy ecru head.  The cap sits as a quarter-inched layer of tiny, dense bubbles.  This one is a bit cloudy, almost giving the impression of an often-consumed breakfast drink.  Microscopic bubbles awake and make their way to the top of the glass from its base.

A:  Am aroma redolent with orange greets the nostrils, eventually ceding to a clean, crisp malt background.  There’s a very subtle, almost miss-able floral note, too.

T:  A small zap of sweetness followed by an immense orange-citrus flavor rolls over the palate.  You’d almost think MBC (as opposed to BMC!) poured orange juice into the beer.  But surely, this is not the case.  The El Dorado hops are here in force.  From the malt we get a clean, cracker and slightly cereal-like combination; it plays well with the orangey hops.

F:  Smooth, due to the addition of flaked oats, but with plenty of carbonation and a slight oily feel.  Medium-light body and medium finish.  This one sticks around for a while, with a moderate bitterness and plenty of juicy orange hops on the finish.  The end is more zest than flesh, but that’s fine by me.

O:  Delicious, drinkable, refreshing.  Great introduction to fruity American Pale Ales.  Ideal for drinking with brunch or a sunny spring day.  Beautiful.

Suggested food pairing:  Spring-mix salad with orange vinaigrette dressing, creamy cheddar cheese, Eggs over easy with a dash of salt and pepper with a side of bacon, lightly-treated white fish, fruit tart

 

Gose Down Easy: Anderson Valley’s Briney Melon Gose

On the docket:  12 oz. can of Anderson Valley Brewing Co.’s Briney Melon Gose

Poured into:  Innis & Gunn stemmed craft beer glass

S:  The body pours a golden straw and sports a creamy bone head.  The cap builds, lingers, then eventually settles down to a small, tight and hugging band of bubbles.  Tiny bubbles helix their way to the top from the base of the glass.  Lacing is thin, delicate but consistent bands with each sip.  There’s a slight haze to this, but does not detract from the beauty.

A:  Subtle but luscious watermelon, the slightest hint of funk, clean briny mineral, and soft malty sweetness comprise the nose.  A strong sniff reveals the rind of the watermelon, not simply the meat.  Another long sniff pulls out a faint floral aspect, it must be the Bravo hops.

T:  Certainly the most interesting aspect of the beer, the fruit flavor is everything done right about fruit used in beer.  The melon is present, but gentle, and melds with the pale malt and malted wheat into a lovely tang.  The sea salt is there too, adding balance to the acidity and fruit.  And, while it’s certainly sour, there a nice give and take between sweet and salty, sour and fruity.

F:  Crisp, and dainty on the palate with ample carbonation, lending another element to its drinkability and and refreshing nature.  The finish is relatively short, with a small dose of bitterness in addition to the melon flavor that rides along the entire time, beginning to end.

O:  Excellent execution of a fruit-flavored gose, and less on the traditional side (no coriander for starters).  Thirst-inducing and paradoxically, thirst-quenching.  Sessionable at 4.2%, imagine this on draft after a day out hiking, biking, running, kayaking, or any other summer activity in the sun.

Suggested food pairing:  goat cheese, summer ingredient salads, grilled chicken or fish with lemon-pepper seasoning (because the beer already brings the salt)